HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







The Life And Writings Of Saint Patrick -Saint Patrick

NOW that their dispute was settled at Tara, the sons of Amalgaid set out for their native territory. They travelled in twelve ‘chariots,’ and Patrick, who accompanied them, gave a place in his own chariot to young Prince Conall, so that it was the thirteenth chariot. Their route from Tara lay by the great north-western road, through Meath and Longford, crossing the Shannon somewhere near Carrick-on-Shannon. It was a much-frequented track, and was called sometimes Slighe na g-carbad, or the Road of the Chariots. Patrick, too, in fulfilment of his promise to Conall, and perhaps also at the request of Laeghaire, was accompanied by Enda Crom, as well as by young Conall, who were now his devoted friends and protectors. But Oengus had no affection for them—either for Patrick or for his own nephew, Conall. He hated both cordially; and he was determined, if possible, to get rid of them. So going forward, in advance of their party, he solicited his brothers, Fergus and Fedilmid, to kill Patrick and Conall. They agreed to do so, as soon as they came to the territory of Corann in the Co. Sligo, part of which, it seems, belonged to their family. But this plot miscarried, for the brothers, on consideration, refused to kill the holy Patrick, as well as their own brother and brother’s son.

Then the party journeyed onward through the west of Sligo, and crossing the Ox Mountains, most likely by the wild valley of Lough Talt, they would soon descend to Ballina, where, doubtless, they crossed the Moy, and so they came into their father’s land of Tirawley. Now, the wicked Oengus, disappointed in Corann, once more sought the life of Patrick. Tirawley, being a royal seat, had a college of the Druids, who, as usual, dwelt near the King’s dun. Oengus went forward, and raised their anger against the daring cleric, who was coming into their own territory to overthrow their worship. So they all gathered round the chief Druid, Rechred by name, who urged them to combine and kill their common enemy. The Tripartite says they, with their retainers, formed themselves into two bands, one of which was led by the Druid, Reon, and the other by Rechred, the chief Druid, who had nine of his disciples with him, all clothed in their white priestly garments.






This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Attribution: Sicarr




Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com