HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







The Life And Writings Of Saint Patrick -Saint Patrick

From Kilcullen Patrick went into the territory called Western Liffè, extending south-westwards towards Athy, between the Liffey and the Barrow. Briga of the Hy Ercain tribe, who was, apparently, a Christian maiden belonging to the tribe exiled for their faith by the King of South Leinster, gave timely warning to Patrick that ‘pit falls’ were prepared for him on his road through this district of Western Liffè. But Patrick, strong in faith and confidence in God, pushed on after giving a blessing to the maiden Briga.

Now the sons of Laigis (son of Find) had made deep pools on the road and covered them with green sods so that Patrick might unawares drive into the bog-holes. But, remembering Briga’s warning, when he came to the pit he stopped. The youths were watching the event. “For God’s sake,” they said, “drive on,” as if they said, “Trust in your God, and drive on.” “Yes, for God’s sake drive on,” said Patrick to his charioteer, and he drove safely over the treacherous holes. He did nothing or said nothing harmful to the boys, who knew no better; but he cursed Laigis, son of Find, who had instigated them to do the wicked deed. He said there never would spring from him king or bishop, and that a foreign prince would be over them for ever. Laigis dwelt at the place afterwards called Moin Columcille, now Moone, in the South of Kildare; and it may be that the prophecy had special reference to the Geraldines, princes of another race, who have ruled that territory around their castle of Kilkea almost from the Conquest to the present day,

Briga, daughter of Fergna of the Hy Ercain, who gave the warning to Patrick, was blessed by him with a fruitful blessing—and not herself only but her father, her brothers, and all the Hy Ercain were blessed by the Saint. They dwelt a little to the south of the place now called Narraghmore, and Patrick went to visit them there, and remained with them for some time, for he founded a church in that stead. It was of old a famous place, and was known as Bile Macc Cruaigh (the Tree of the Sons of Cruach), but ‘to-day it is called Forrach Patraic,’ that is the Meeting Place of Patrick, where he sat and taught and baptised the people. The sacred tree had been previously the scene of pagan rites celebrated especially at the inauguration of the local chiefs, which took place on the hill. But now that it was blessed by Patrick it took his name, and became the scene of Christian assemblies gathered there for the worship of God. Narraghmore is merely Forraghmore with the article prefixed and the change of a letter, and still gives its name to a townland, parish, and barony in the south of the County Kildare. Briga, a different person from the great St. Brigid of Kildare, was daughter of Fergna, son of Cobhtach, of the Hy Ercain, whose sons were driven from Carlow by Enna Cennselach. She must have been therefore a Christian herself, and a niece of those sons of Cobhtach to whom we have referred before. A branch of their family had previously occupied this territory around Narraghmore, and so it would seem the exiled brothers and sisters took refuge with them when they were driven from the south of Leinster. The maiden herself and her six sisters became holy nuns, and Patrick founded a church for them close to the place where they dwelt at Glais Eile, which still retains its name in the form of Glas Hely, and is situated about one mile south of Narraghmore. Near at hand, too, is St. Patrick’s Well, which he blessed for the special use of the seven virgin sisters. Their festival is celebrated on the 7th of January. Fergna, their father, and their brother, Finnan, are also said to have retired from the world to serve God in solitude and prayer, so that the blessing of Patrick on the maiden herself and upon her father and her brothers, was, indeed, a bountiful blessing. It seems highly probable, too, that when Bishop Fith went into exile with his converts from south Carlow he accompanied this holy family to Narraghmore, and remained with them until he heard of the arrival of St. Patrick at the royal dun of Naas. If this conjecture be well founded we may safely conclude that there were Christians in Narraghmore before they were to be found in any other part of the County Kildare.






This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Attribution: Sicarr




Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com