HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A Practical Commentary On Holy Scripture by Frederick Justus Knecht D.D.

[Gen. 12:1–9]

AMONGST the wicked there was one just and upright man. He was called Abram. The Lord chose him in order that through him and his posterity the true faith and hope in the promised Redeemer might be preserved and propagated on the earth. He said to him: “Go forth out of thy country and from thy kindred, and out of thy father’s house, and come into the land which I will show thee, and I will make of thee a great nation. I will bless thee, and magnify thy name, and thou shalt be blessed, and in thee shall all the nations of the world be blessed.”

The father of Abram had gone from Ur in Chaldea, and taken up his abode in Haran, with his relatives; but as idolatry had at last made its way even into that family, the Lord called ‘Abram forth from amongst his kindred. Abram believed the word of the Lord, and instantly set out for Chanaan, taking with him Sarai, his wife, and Lot, his nephew, and his servants and his herds of cattle. After a long journey, he arrived in the land of Chanaan, and came to Sichem (Fig. 5). He was then seventy-five years old. Chanaan, on account of its beauty and fertility, was called a land flowing with milk and honey. There the Lord appeared again to Abram and said to him: “To thy seed will I give this land.” Henceforth Chanaan was also called the Promised Land. Abram, wishing to show his gratitude, raised in that place an altar to the Lord.

 

The second promise of the Messias. The words: “In thee shall all the kindred of the world be blessed”, contain the second promise of the Messias. The second promise is more explicit than the first, for it says that the Divine Redeemer shall be born of the seed of Abram.

Necessity of faith. With good reason we are told so explicitly that Abram believed God, for faith is the first and most necessary of virtues. Faith brought Abram into the Promised Land; and it is only through faith that we can attain to the promised land of heaven.

Grounds of faith. Abram believed in God, and in His word, because God is the very truth.

The characteristics of faith. The faith of Abram had all the characteristics of true faith, being entire, firm, steadfast, and living. His faith was entire, because he believed all that God told him. It was firm, because he doubted nothing, but believed unreservedly in the words of the Lord. It would have been quite natural for him to ask how it was possible for a great nation to spring from him who yet had no child; but he gave ear to no such thought, and simply stood firm by the word of God. His faith was steadfast, because he did not allow it to be shaken either by the ridicule and arguments of his unbelieving relations, or by the difficulties and dangers of the journey before him. Finally, his faith was living, because he acted up to it, and did all that God required of him.

Obedience to God. Abram’s cheerful obedience to God was a fruit of his living faith. God’s command to leave his home was not an easy one to obey, for the natural love of home and kindred is a very strong one. Moreover, God did not tell him whither He was going to lead him. He was commanded to go into an unknown country, among strange people, and was entirely ignorant as to his future fate. Nevertheless, he obeyed God’s command promptly and cheerfully. “By faith Abram obeyed to go out into a place which he was to receive for an inheritance, and he went out not knowing whither he went” (Hebr. 11:8). He has given us a grand example of obedience, which we ought to imitate. “He that believeth God, taketh heed to the commandments” (Ecclus. 32:28).

APPLICATION. God has not asked of you anything so hard as He asked of Abram; and yet how often you disobey Him! Whenever you tell lies, or fly into a passion, or neglect your prayers, or do not do as your parents tell you, you are disobeying God. Be sorry for your disobedience, and when you say your morning prayers, make a resolution to obey promptly and cheerfully those who are set over you.

Having a firm faith, Abram trusted himself cheerfully to the guidance of divine Providence. A childlike confidence in the Providence of our Heavenly Father is a great support and comfort to us in all the circumstances of our lives. Unhappy he who has not got this confidence! We do not know what will happen to us in the future; but we do know that our Father in heaven cares for us, and that not a sparrow can fall to the ground without His knowledge and consent. So whatever happens to you, say: “Whatever God does, is well done, even though I cannot understand it.” Say constantly: “God’s will be done!” “Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven!”








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com