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Diocese of Tulancingo



(De Tulancingo).

Diocese in the Mexican Republic, suffragan of Mexico. Its area is about 8000 square miles, that is to say, almost that of the State of Hidalgo, in which the diocese is situated. It comprises the greater part of the State of Hidalgo, with the exception of a few parishes situated in the western part, and which belong to the Archbishopric of Mexico; but in return it has a few parishes in the State of Vera Cruz. Its population is 641,895 (1910). The bishop lives in the town of Tulancingo (population, 8000), although the capital of the state is the important mining town of Pachuca, situated 7962 feet above the level of the sea, with a population of about 38,620 inhabitants (1910). The Gospel was first preached in this territory in the first half of the sixteenth century by the Franciscan Fathers shortly after their arrival in Mexico; they then founded a convent at Tulancingo, whose first guardian was the venerable Father Juan Padilla, who died from the results of an assault made by the unfaithful Indians of New Mexico. The Augustinian Fathers also worked in this region.

On 16 March, 1863, Pius IX made this see suffragan of the Archbishopric of Mexico. When created, many asked that the episcopal see be in the city of Huejutla; preference was given, however, to the city of Tulancingo. This new see was formed from thirty-eight parishes of the Archbishopric of Mexico, and from sixteen taken from the Bishopric of Puebla. It has 1 seminary with 40 students; 39 parochial schools; 5 Catholic colleges, and about 2352 students; there are 6 Protestant colleges with 255 students, and 6 Protestant churches. The town of Tulancingo existed long before the conquest; it is said to have been founded by the Toltecas in A.D. 697 and bore the name of Tollantzinco. Its most noted building is the cathedral, built in the beginning of the nineteenth century.

Vera, Catecismo geogr·fico histÛrico estadÌstico de la igl. méx. (Amecameca, 1881).

Camillus Crivelli.








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