HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







Walla-Walla Indians



A Shahaptian tribe dwelling on the Walla-Walla (i.e. rushing water) River and the Columbia in Washington and Oregon, from Snake River to the Umatilla. Their language is akin to that of the Nez Percés but forms a distinct dialect. By the treaty of 1855 they were placed on the Umatilla reservation in Oregon, where they still remain. They number only 461, and are mixed with Nez Percés and Cayuse. Their family organization was loose, and the clan system not observed. The scantiness of their food supply, necessitating frequent migrations, prevented any continued development of the village system. Their food consisted mainly of roots, berries, and salmon. At present most of the tribe are farmers and stock breeders. The Walla-Walla were visited by Lewis and Clarke in 1804, and were evangelized by the Jesuit pioneers of the Northwest about forty years later.

A. A. MacErlean.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com