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Terence Albert O'Brien



Born at Limerick, 1600; died there, 31 October, 1651. He joined the Dominicans, receiving the name Albert at Limerick, where his uncle, Maurice O"Brien, was then prior. In 1622 he studied at Toledo and after eight years returned to Limerick, to become twice prior there and once at Lorrha, and in 1643 provincial of his order in Ireland. His services to the Catholic Confederation were highly valued by the Supreme Council. At Rome he received the degree of Master in Theology, and on his return made a visitation of two houses of his province at Lisbon, where it was reported that urban VIII was about to appoint him coadjutor to the Bishop of Emly. He was again named for the coadjutorship by the Supreme Council at the end of 1645, and recommended by the nuncio Rinuccini. Subsequently, at the petition of many bishops, Rinuccini wrote (17 March, 1646) that Burgat, Vicar-General of Emly, was a suitable person for the coadjutorship. In August he renewed his recommendation of Father Terence O"Brien, who was named coadjutor with the right of succession, in March, 1647, and eight months later was consecrated by Rinuccini. Throughout the ensuing troubles he adhered to the nuncio. He signed the declaration against Inchiquin's truce in 1648, and the declaration against Ormond in 1650. When Limerick was besieged in 1651, he urged a stubborn resistance and so embittered the Ormondists and the Parliamentarians, that in the capitulation he was excluded from quarter and protection. The day after the surrender, he with Major General Purcell and Father Wolf were discovered in the pest-house, brought before a court martial and ordered for execution, which took place on the following day.

MEEHAN, Memoirs of the Irish Hierarchy in the Seventeenth Century (6th ed., Dublin, about 1888); O'REILLY, Memorials of those who suffered for the Catholic Faith (London, 1868); MURPHY, Our Martyrs (Dublin, 1896); DE BURGO, Hibernia Dominicana (Cologne, 1762); WALSH in Irish Eccl. Rec., Feb., 1894








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