HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







It is the common opinion of theologians that an inspired book may perish, and that some de facto have perished. As authorities for this opinion we may cite Origen, Chrysostom, St. Thomas, Bellarmine, Serarius, Pineda, Bonfrere, and nearly all the later theologians.

Salmeron strove to set aside this opinion by the following arguments: The Providence of God, which gave a book to teach men, will preserve that book. Moreover, if the Church, even in its preparatory state in the Old Law, should allow a book to perish, which had been committed to her care, she would be unfaithful to her trust. In response we say first that two questions are confused here. It is one thing that a book divinely inspired, not yet canonized by the Church, should perish; another that a book delivered to the Church by canonization should perish. This latter fact has never happened. Franzelin, in response to Salmeron, argues that it is possible that even a canonical book should perish, for the reason that such book is not the sole or absolutely necessary means of teaching men the truth. The Church is only infallible and indefectible in furnishing an adequate means to impart truth to man, and her teaching power would not be hampered by the loss of a book, or portion thereof, of Holy Scripture. The argument of Salmeron that God, who gave the book, would preserve it is feeble, for the book may be superseded by another, or it may not be necessary for succeeding ages.

The common opinion is, therefore, that an inspired book may perish, and that some have perished. Many proverbs and canticles of Solomon and writings of prophets, spoken of in the Scriptures, have certainly perished, and some, at least, of these were inspired.

In the Old Testament we find mention of the following works: The Book of the Wars of the Lord (Num. 21:14); The Book of the Just (Jos. 10:13); The Book of the Words of the Days of Solomon (2 Sam. 19:41); The Book of the Words of the Days of the Kings of Juda (3 Kings, 14:19); The Book of the Words of the Days of the Kings of Israel (3 Kings. 14:20); The Book of Samuel the Prophet (1 Chron. 29:29); The Words of Nathan, the Prophet (l. c.); The Book of Gad, the Prophet (l. c.); The Books of Ahiah (2 Chron. 9:29); The Vision of Addo, the Prophet (l. c.); The Book of Semeia, the Prophet (2 Chron. 12:15); The Book of Jehu, the Son of Hanan (2 Chron. 20:34); The Discourse of Hosai (2 Chron. 33:19); The Deeds of Oziah by Isaiah (2 Chron. 26:22); three thousand Parables of Solomon (3 Kings 4:22); five thousand Canticles of Solomon (l. c); the treatise of Solomon on Natural History (l. c.); certain writings of Jeremiah (2 Maccab. 2:1); The Book of the Days of John Hyrcanus (1 Maccab. 16:24); The Book of Jason, the Cyrenean (2 Maccab. 2:24).

We hold it undoubted that a person inspired, in one production, may write another without such influence of the Holy Spirit. We admit that some of the mentioned works were not inspired; but there are others whose titles clearly prove that they were inspired works, and we no longer possess them.

Of the New Testament, nearly all admit that one of Pauls Epistles to the Corinthians (1 Cor. 5:9), and the Epistle to the Church of Laodicea (Coloss. 4:16), have perished. Who will deny that in these Paul also was inspired?

Wherefore, we conclude that the opinion which maintains the possibility and the actuality of the loss of inspired writings, rests on convincing data.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com