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The Historical Works Of Venerable Bede

THE Holy Gospel informs us that the Lord Jesus, on his way to Jericho, to confirm the hearts of those who were with him in their belief of his majesty, restored sight to a blind man, who called to him: so that by opening the eyes of one that was blind, the hearts of many might be spiritually enlightened. Thus St. Vedast also restored sight, with Christ’s assistance, to a certain blind man; and by this miracle confirmed the faith of the king which by his preaching he had planted in his heart, so that the king himself perceived that the illumination of the mind was as necessary to him as that of the eye to the blind man, and that the same effect which Divine Grace had produced by the prayer of his servant in the darkened eye of the body, was brought about by the same Divine power through the teaching of his same servant, and by the infusion of spiritual light into his own heart. For the king’s excellency being on a journey with a worthy company of attendants, and a large multitude of people, came to a certain village, called in the language of the natives Wungesipagus, near the town of Reguliaca, which is situated on the flowery banks of the river Axna; and behold, as the king and people were crossing this river, a certain blind man met them, who for a long time had never seen the light of the sun. His blindness possibly was for no fault of his, but that the works of God might be manifested in him, and that by the illumination of his eyes the hearts of many might be enlightened by the spirit. This man, hearing from those who were passing that way, that Christ’s servant, St. Vedast, was travelling in the same company, cried out, “Holy Vedast, beloved by God have mercy upon me, and earnestly entreat the Divine power to assist my forlorn condition. I ask not gold nor silver, but that my eyes may be enlightened by your prayers.” The man of God immediately became sensible of divine power communicated to him, not only for the sake of the blind man, but of all the people who were present. He forthwith began to pray, and trusting in the Divine love, made with his right hand the sign of the cross over the eyes of the blind man, saying, “Lord Jesus, who art the true light, and didst open the eyes of the blind man when he called unto thee, open the eyes of this man also, that this people may understand that thou art the only God who doest miracles in heaven and on earth.” Straightway the blind man received his sight, and went on his road rejoicing. In memory of this miracle a church has since been founded by pious men on the spot, in which faithful worshippers to this day derive benefit from Divine miracles.








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