HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 









On Cleaving To God
Chapter 7

How the heart should be gathered within itself

   What is more, as is said in the book On the Spirit and the Soul (of St.
   Augustine), to ascend to God means to enter into oneself. He who
   entering within and penetrating his inmost nature, goes beyond himself,
   he is truly ascending to God. So let us withdraw our hearts from the
   distractions of this world, and recall them to the inner joys, so that
   we can establish them to some degree in the light of divine
   contemplation. For this is the life and peace of our hearts - to be
   established by intent in the love of God, and to be sweetly remade by
   his comforting. But the reason why we are in so many ways hindered in
   the practical enjoyment of this matter and are unable to get into it is
   clearly because the human mind is so distracted by worries that it
   cannot bring its memory to turn within, is so clouded by its
   imaginations that it cannot return to itself with its understanding,
   and is so drawn away by its desires that it is quite unable to come
   back to itself by desire for inner sweetness and spiritual joy. Thus it
   is so prostrate among the sense objects presented to it that it cannot
   enter into itself as the image of God. It is therefore right and
   necessary for the mind to raise itself above itself and everything
   created by the abandonment of everything, with humble reverence and
   great trust, and to say within itself, He whom I seek, love, thirst for
   and desire from everything and more than anything is not a thing of the
   senses or the imagination, but is above everything that can be
   experienced by the senses and the intellect. He cannot be experienced
   by any of the senses, but is completely desirable to my will. He is
   moreover not discernable, but is perfectly desirable to my inner
   affections. He cannot be comprehended, but can be loved in his fullness
   with a pure heart, for he is above all lovable and desirable, and of
   infinite goodness and perfection. And then a darkness comes over the
   mind and it is raised up into itself and penetrates even deeper. And
   the more inward-looking the desire for it, the more powerful this means
   of ascent to the mysterious contemplation of the holy Trinity in Unity
   and Unity in Trinity in Jesus Christ is, and the more interior the
   yearning, the more productive it is. Certainly in matters spiritual the
   more inward they are the greater they are as spiritual experiences. For
   this reason, never give up, never stop until you have tasted some
   pledge, as I might say, or foretaste of the future full experience, and
   until you have obtained the satisfaction of however small a first
   fruits of the divine joy. And do not give up pursuing it and following
   its scent until you have seen the God of gods in Sion. Do not stop or
   turn back in your spiritual journey and your union and adherence to God
   within you until you have achieved what you have been seeking. Take as
   a pattern of this the example of those climbing an ordinary mountain.
   If our mind is involved by its desires in the things which are going on
   below, it is immediately carried away by endless distractions and side
   tracks, and being to some extent divided against itself, is weakened
   and as it were scattered amongst the things which it seeks with its
   desires. The result is ceaseless movement, travel without an arrival,
   and labour without rest. If on the other hand our heart and mind can
   withdraw itself by its desire and love from the infinite distraction
   below of the things beneath it, can learn to be with itself, abandoning
   these lower things and gathering itself within itself into the one
   unchanging and satisfying good, and can hold to it inseparably with its
   will, it is correspondingly more and more gathered together in one and
   strengthened, as it is raised up by knowledge and desire. In this way
   it will become accustomed to the true supreme good within itself until
   it will be made completely immovable and arrive securely at that true
   life which is the Lord God himself, so that it can now rest in him
   within and in peace without any changeability or vicissitude of time,
   perfectly gathered within itself in the secret divine abode in Christ
   Jesus who is the way for those who come to him, the truth and life.
    







Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com