HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 









On Cleaving To God
Chapter 1

On the highest and supreme perfection of man, in so far as it is possible in this life

   I have had the idea of writing something for myself on and about the
   state of complete and full abstraction from everything and of cleaving
   freely, confidently, nakedly and firmly to God alone, so as to describe
   it fully (in so far as it is possible in this abode of exile and
   pilgrimage), especially since the goal of Christian perfection is the
   love by which we cleave to God. In fact everyone is obligated, to this
   loving cleaving to God as necessary for salvation, in the form of
   observing the commandments and conforming to the divine will, and the
   observation of the commandments excludes everything that is contrary to
   the nature and habit of love, including mortal sin. Members of
   religious orders have committed themselves in addition to evangelical
   perfection, and to the things that constitute a voluntary and
   counselled perfection by means of which one may arrive more quickly to
   the supreme goal which is God. The observation of these additional
   commitments excludes as well the things that hinder the working and
   fervour of love, and without which one can come to God, and these
   include the renunciation of all things, of both body and mind, exactly
   as one's vow of profession entails. Since indeed the Lord God is
   Spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and in truth,
   in other words, by knowledge and love, that is, understanding and
   desire, stripped of all images. This is what is referred to in Matthew
   6.6, When you pray, enter into your inner chamber,' that is, your inner
   heart, and having closed the door,' that is of your senses, and there
   with a pure heart and a clear conscience, and with faith unfeigned,
   pray to your Father,' in spirit and in truth, in secret.' This can be
   done best when a man is disengaged and removed from everything else,
   and completely recollected within himself. There, in the presence of
   Jesus Christ, with everything, in general and individually, excluded
   and wiped out, the mind alone turns in security confidently to the Lord
   its God with its desire. In this way it pours itself forth into him in
   full sincerity with its whole heart and the yearning of its love, in
   the most inward part of all its faculties, and is plunged, enlarged,
   set on fire and dissolved into him.
     







Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com