HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







St. Joseph's Society for Colored Missions



This organization began its labours in 1871, when four young priests from Mill Hill were put in charge of St. Francis Xavier's church, with a large congregation of black Catholics, in Baltimore. Other black missions were soon begun at Louisville, Charleston, Washington, Richmond, Norfolk, and other places in the South. The society in the United States increased so rapidly and its missions were so successful that in 1892 it was made independent of Mill Hill and established its headquarters at Baltimore. It soon grew to almost 50 priests, who ran 35 missions throughout the South. The society opened numerous educational institutions, including: St. Joseph's Seminary in Baltimore, to train missionaries for the black missions; Epiphany Apostolic College, Walbrook, Baltimore, a preparatory school for St. Joseph's Seminary; St. Joseph's Catechetical College near Montgomery, Alabama, to train young black men as catechists and teachers; and St. Joseph's Industrial School at Clayton, Delaware, an agricultural and trade school for black youth.

MICHAEL OTT








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com