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Edward Génicot



Moral theologian, b. at Antwerp, Belgium, 18 June, 1856; d. at Louvain, 21 February, 1900. After making a brilliant course of studies at the Jesuit college in his native city, he entered the Society of Jesus, 27 September, 1872. He was successively professor of humanities and of rhetoric at Ghent and at Antwerp, and after being ordained priest and sustaining a public defense in all theology, taught first canon law and then moral theology at the Jesuit college in Louvain from 1889 until his comparatively early and unexpected death. Father Génicot was a professor well liked by all his classes because of the solidity and clearness of his teaching. In 1896 he published his "Theologiæ Moralis Institutiones" in which the sixth edition, in harmony with recent decrees of the Holy See, appeared in 1909 (Brussels). Father Génicot drew his inspiration chiefly from the large work of Ballerini-Palmieri. His own work is characterized by a clearness of exposition, firm and straightforward judgment, avoidance and subtleties and rejection of defective arguments; also by marked intellectual honesty that dares to follow principles to their utmost conclusions and set down the conduct confessors may legitimately follow in the confessional. Confessors have no reason to fear the broadness of his conclusions, if they do not actually pass by the limits prescribed by the author. Another work, "Casus Conscientiæ", was published after the author's death. The third edition (1906) appeared with additions and corrections in 1909 (Louvain). These Casus, gathered in large part from actual experience, are remarkable for their presentation of real life and are something more than a mere repetition of theory.

J. SALSMANS








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