HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







Titus



Roman Emperor 79-81, b. 30 Dec., 41; d. 13 Sept., 81; son of the Emperor Vespasian, and from the year 70 Cæsar and coregent; he was highly educated and a brilliant poet and orator in both Latin and Greek. He won military fame in the war in the years 69-70, against the revolted Jews. In April, 70, he appeared before the walls of Jerusalem, and conquered and destroyed the city after a siege of five months. He wished to preserve the Temple, but in the struggle with the Jews who rushed out of it a soldier threw a brand into the building. The siege and taking of the city were accompanied by barbarous cruelties. The next year Titus celebrated his victory by a triumph; to increase the fame of the Flavian dynasty the inscription on the triumphal arch represented the overthrow of the helpless people as an heroic achievement. The historical significance of the destruction of the Jewish state is that the Jews have since then been scattered among foreign nations. As ruler Titus was by no means popular; he shared in the voluptuousness of the Rome of that era, and was responsible for the acts of violence which occurred during the administration of his father. Consequently an evil reign was expected. However, in the short period of his independent authority, Titus agreeably disappointed these anticipations. His noble benevolence was exhibited in the saying that the day was lost in which he had done no one a kindness; he gained the honourable title of "amor et deliciæ generis humani" (the darling and admiration of the human race). During his reign Italy suffered from two severe calamities. On 24 Aug., 79, the celebrated eruption of Vesuvius buried the cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiæ, and some months later a fearful conflagration did great damage at Rome. On both occasions Titus showed a fine humanitarianism. His actions were not free from ostentation and seeking after effect. He died from the effects of his luxurious life.

SCHILLER, Geschichte der römischen Kaiserzeit, I (Gotha, 1883), 518-20; DOMASZEWSKI, Geschichte der römischen Kaiser, II (Leipzig, 1909), 128-57; MERIVALE, History of the Romans under the Empire (London, 1850-62), lx.

Klemens Löffler.








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com