HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







Michael O'Loghlen



Born at Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland, in 1789; died 1846. Educated at Ennis Academy, and Trinity College, Dublin, he was called to the Irish Bar in 1811. By force of ability he won a position as a brilliant pleader. His first real success was as a substitute for O'Connell on the day of the memorable duel between O'Connell and D'Esterre (1815); from 1820 to 1830 many cases came from O'Connell through whose influence O'Loghlen was appointed solicitor general for Ireland in 1834, the first Catholic since James II. He was also elected M.P. for Dungarvan, and when Perrin was elevated to the Bench in 1835, he was made attorney general. A year later he succeeded Sir William Cusack Smith as baron of the exchequer — the first Catholic judge for almost one hundred and fifty years. Finally, in 1837, on the death of Sir William MacMahon he was given the Irish mastership of the rolls, which he held till his death. As master of the rolls he effected many legal reforms.

O'FLANAGAN, Recollections of the Irish Bar (Dublin, 1870).

W. H. Grattan-Flood.








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com