HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







Aldfrith



A Northumbrian king, son of King Oswin; d. 14 December, 705. He succeeded his brother, Ecgfrith. William of Malmesbury says he received his education in Ireland, where he passed his early life, and imbibed there a love of learning and learned men. He was well versed in the Scriptures. His taste for literature is shown by his parting with a large piece of land as payment for a copy of the "Cosmographi". Adamnan, Abbot of Iona, on the occasion of his visit to England for the redemption of some captives, presented his book "De Locis Sanctis" to Aldfrith as a testimonial of the King's appreciation of learning, and Aldhelm, Abbot of Malmesbury, dedicated his work on "Metres" to him. Aldfrith restored Northumbria, which had been nearly ruined by warfare in the preceding reign, to peace and prosperity. He recalled St. Wilfrid to his Bishopric of Hexham, and later on to that of York, but afterwards became hostile to him. An effort at reconciliation, made some years later at the Council of Ætswinapath by Aldfrith, failed. The dissension between Aldfrith and Wilfrid was largely due to their respective advocacy of two different schools of learning-the Roman and the Irish-and of administration, one favouring the Roman and the other the Irish party. Just before his death, however, Aldfrith enjoined on his successor the necessity of becoming reconciled with Wilfrid. Little is known of the results of Aldfrith's rule. William of Malmesbury says Northumbria was considerably restricted through victories of the Picts, and Bede dates the deterioration of ecclesiastical administration in the kingdom from Aldfrith's death.

STUBBS in Dict. Christ. Biog., I, 77; HARDIMAN, Irish Minstrelsy, II, 372; TANNER, Bibl, Brit. Hib. (1748), 35, 245.

JOHN J. A' BECKET








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com